First Issues - 1865 to 1867

page 7.1


This is the seventh display in a series intended to show the first issues of every country. That includes the first stamp and (where issued) the first commemorative, airmail, charity, official and post due. Summary pages of the previous first stamps are shown on the reverse of pages four, five and six.


Ecuador

Ecuador SG1b Sc2 Ecuador SG118 Sc63 Ecuador SG458 ScC8 Ecuador SG374 ScRA1 Ecuador SG-O20 Sc-O1 Ecuador SG-D105 Sc-J1
1st January 1865
SG1b Sc2
Commemorative
1896 SG118 Sc63
Success of the Liberal Party
Airmail
[1928] SG458 Sc-C8
Charity
1920 SG374 Sc-RA1
Compulsory tax
Official
1886 SG-O20 Sc-O1
Post Due
1896 SG-D105 Sc-J1

 
Charity
1944 SG711a Sc-B1
Mendez Hospital

Ecuador led the new entrants on 1st January 1865 (overprinted GB stamps had been used previously). The catalogue #1, the 1 reale yellow was released in 1872, the first stamp chronologically being the 1865 #2 as shown. For airmails, Scott identifies expensive overprints Sc-C1 to C6 for a private service with government sanction: the stamp shown is the first real airmail. For Charity, there is the usual Scott distinction between postal tax and charity, favouring the 1944 issue.


Dominican Republic

Dominican Republic SG955 Sc615   Dominican Republic SG678 Sc-B1 Dominican Republic SG-O121 Sc-O1  
[19th August 1865]
1965 commemorative SG955 Sc615
Commemorative
1899 SG89 Sc100
Columbus Mausoleum Fund
Charity
1957 SG678 Sc-B1
Hungarian Refugees Fund
Official
1902 SG-O121 Sc-O1
Post Due
1901 SG-D117 Sc-J1

Dominican Republic SG256 Sc-C1
Airmail
1929 SG256 Sc-C1
 
Registration
1935 SG-R339 Sc-G1

The 19th August 1865 first issue is £200 mint and used and so the centenary commemorative is shown, with a miniature sheet overleaf. The first airmail is rather large and therefore shown left. There was an expensive 1931 compulsory tax stamp for hurricane relief and so on this occasion Scott’s B1 for Hungarian Refugees is preferred. The Dominican Republic invented the Insured Letter or registration stamp in 1935 and has a rather fine entry in the Express digression.





Index


page written August 2013